“Tempo Zulu” Projects

Spring 2014 Intro Unit Week 3:    Tempo Zulu

Inspired by the “Tempo Zulu” Project in Siena’s historic center (www.tempozulu.org), students were asked to create their own proposal for a pavement stone or a series of stones with a response to the specific location(s) they select.   Students were encouraged to respond to one of the locations that we visited during the first two weeks of our program, and to think about how they can use the stone to offer a unique insight into the location they choose, or to encourage others to view the location from a different perspective.

Student Project Proposals:

Abigail Weiss: For her “Tempo Zulu Project”, Abby created a proposal for a paving stone to be installed by the overlook to San Domanico, with the inscribed word “franella” (local slang for making out) responding to the tendency of locals and tourists to find this an ideal place to kiss.

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Ana Cvijanovic: For her “Tempo Zulu Project” Ana created a proposal for paving stones to be installed in the Onda contrada with the inscriptions “l cavallo è piu importante di me” and “Il cavallo e l’arte in buon accordo.” Her Tempo Zulu project was very thoughtfully developed in response to dymamics that she has observed within the culture of Siena, and the project was very strongly presented during the group critique.

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Anna Berlin For her “Tempo Zulu Project” Anna created a proposal for paving stones to be installed in the historic heart of Siena, the “Castelvecchi” neighborhood, with the inscriptions “Do not not touch” and “è (severemente) vietato non toccare”. The project was an thoughtful and provocative and playful response to the tensions she has observed between the contemporary city of Siena and its historic legacy, and to the Tempo Zulu project specifically.

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Britni Ulrich: For her “Tempo Zulu Project” Britni created a very interseting project: a proposal for a paving stone to be installed at the threshold of the Questura office of Siena with the inscription of the word “Permesso” with black marble text on a block of white marble, and a smaller stone below white marble letters inset in a black marble stone with the word “negato” The word play explores the tensions of power structures very palpable int his location which is a center for foreigners to receive permits of stay and other official paperwork.

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Elena Chemerska: For her “Tempo Zulu Project” Elena focused on the subject of the sun, her project was not very well presented or well thought out, but a project with potential.

Elena, week 3 project

 

Ellen King: For her “Tempo Zulu Project” Ellen developed a proposal for a paving stone to be installed along the main shopping street of Siena, Banchi di sopra, with the inscription “Perfection f. un’amica che non si può conoscere” responding to the ideals of fashion and beauty and unattainable ideals that are sought after in the context of high-end shopping.

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Shristi Shrestha: For her “Tempo Zulu Project” Ellen developed a proposal for a paving stone to be installed along the main shopping street of Siena, Banchi di sopra, with the inscription “Perfection f. un’amica che non si può conoscere” responding to the ideals of fashion and beauty and unattainable ideals that are sought after in the context of high-end shopping.

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Susie Pentelow: For her “Out of the Gates” project, Susie responded to the location of Porta Giustizia though casting in plaster crevices which she discovered along the path to the gate from the school.

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More information on the Tempo Zulu Project:

(Sienese branch of the project “Trésors de voyage” “Travel Treasures”)  A project of: Francesco Carone, Gregorio Galli, Bernardo Giorgi & Christian Posani

Introduction:
Thinking about the relationship and the separation between public urban space and space of artistic and cultural production and working on the dynamics of the city between movements , limits and dispersions ( polis – the walled city – the infinite city ) , we wanted to invite a group of people to work on the structure that enables and symbolizes these dynamics : the street pavement of a city still in the balance between different phases of the development of urban space (Siena).

We then asked a number of artists to propose a sentence or a drawing then as to carve onto some of the city paving stones .

The stones were chosen according to criteria of visual, emotional and spatial relationships with the locations of the town (subjectively ) significant( of commerce, social support , memory and the city life ) .

Many artists have responded to our invitation and through their many gifts have enabled us to donate to the city a work whose function and the nature of which still remain to be explored .

The Tempo Zulu Project:

In the context of the Time Zulu project, twelve artists and intellectuals were invited to create interventions on the paving stones of the historic center of Siena.  The interventions, ranging from a sentence, a design, an embedded insert or inlay, were made by the master stonemason Emilio Friars, an historical memory of the Sienese carvers, on individual stones or groups, then installed throughout the streets of the city.  In the end, some of the people we asked to participate called upon other artistsfor therealization of the interventions on their behalf .

All the stones are placed in an ideal route through the city that will be finalized by the creation of a coincident path of urban trekking by the municipality of Siena.

Those artists who have decided to accept our invitation to participate in the Tempo Zulu project include:

Mario Avallone, Iain Chamber e Lidia Curti, Filippo Frosini, Alberto Garutti, Erik Göngrich, Eva Marisaldi, Michele Dantini // Willy Merz, Luca Pancrazzi, Alfredo Pirri, Anri Sala // Edi Rama

For more information, visit: www.tempozulu.org

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